sources (cited)

A place to keep all of my art, craft, and costuming related sources.

hammpix:

As an artist, you’ll have to draw turned heads countless times. But when the head is turned, drawing the far eye poses a special challenge. This is because we must foreshorten that eye more than we’re used to, and because we’re tempted to shape it like the near eye, which is less foreshortened. Therefore, it’s useful to practice drawing the far eye by itself, without the near eye to throw you off. Print these sheets, draw the eyes, and you’ll save yourself great difficulty later.

Note that all of these eyes are facing our left. You’ll need to practice right-facing eyes as well, so flop the sheets in Photoshop, print them again, and draw those also.

ziggy9911 asked: Just curious on how you approach composition and perspective. I feel as if sometimes I think too hard, not really about what to draw but how to draw it and make it look interesting. The comic panels you have been doing are amazing. Any tips/references on improving my knowledge of composition and perspective? What do you think about as you lay your pencil on the drawing paper? what goes through your mind?

jakewyattriot:

*STANDARD DISCLAIMER* I’m not handing down life lessons or trying to assert that there’s a ‘correct way’ to draw. I’m just trying to make perspective more approachable for thems that want to tackle it.

Okay. Let’s do this.

1. Understand what perspective is and what it’s for. Stay away from rulers while you get comfortable.

Everyone struggles with perspective because 1. it’s not well or widely taught and 2. artists tend to see linear perspective as a set of rules rather than a set of tools.

Linear perspective is a TOOL we use to create and depict SPACE. That’s it. That’s all it is. Your goal is not to draw in ‘accurate linear perspective.’ Stay away from the ruler and precision for as long as you can. Your goal is to create the illusion of three-dimensional space on a two-dimensional surface. Perspective is just a tool to help you construct and correct that space.

2. Know in your bones that you can ONLY learn to draw in perspective through physical practice. There is no other way.

Grab some paper and draw with me. If you match me drawing for drawing you will be more fluent in linear perspective and spatial drawing by the end of this post. Unfortunately if you don’t, you won’t be.

3. Sketch around in rough perspective. NO RULERS.

So let’s make some simple space. let’s start with a two dimensional surface…

K. We have a flat, 2D surface. Let’s create some depth by putting a vanishing point in the middle, and having parallel lines converge towards it. Make a gridded plane inside that space.

Good. Let’s make that space meaningful by adding a dude and a road or something. (Again, parallel ‘depth lines’ will converge into the vanishing point along the horizon)

And now we have the rough illusion of some space. I didn’t use any rulers, and it’s not perfectly accurate, but we got our depth from that vanishing point right in the middle of the page. And since we have a little dude in there, we’ve got human scale, which allows us to gauge the size of the space we’ve created. Gives it meaning.

You need people or cars or some recognizable, human-scale THING in there as a frame of reference or your space won’t mean much to your viewer. Watch. We can make that same basic space a whole lot bigger like this:

Same vanishing point in the same place, completely different scale, and a totally different feeling of space. Cool, right?

3. Sketch around in rough perspective MORE. STAY LOOSE.

See what sort of spaces and feelings you can create with vanishing points and gridded planes on a post-it or something. Super small, super rough. Feel it out. Pick a vanishing point or lay out a grid in perspective, and MAKE SOME SPACE. Do it. Draw, I don’t know, a lady and her dog in a desert. I’ll do it, too.

Good job. LOOK AT YOU creating the illusion of space! This is how you’ll thumbnail and plan anything you want to draw in space. All of my drawings start this way. I think about how I want the viewer to feel and then play around with space and composition until I find something that works.

Once you have a sketch you like, and space that you feel, THEN you can take out the ruler and make it more accurate and convincing.

4. Draw environments from life.

I cannot stress this enough. Draw the world around you, try to draw the shapes and angles as you see them, and you will ‘get’ how and why perspective is used. Use something permanent so that you’ll move fast and commit. I usually use black prismacolor pencil.

You’ll learn or reinforce something with every drawing. I learned a lot about multiple vanishing points from this drawing:

Learned from the receding, winding space I tired to draw here:

Layered, interior spaces:

You get the idea.

Life drawing will also help you develop your own shorthand and language for depicting textures, materials, details, natural and architectural features, etc. Do it. Do it all the time. Go to pretty or interesting places just to draw them.

Take a second and just draw a quick sketch of whatever room you’re in.

5. Perspective in formal Illustration: apply what you’ve learned.

1. I always start with research. For this particular location I looked at Angkor Wat.

2. Once I had enough reference, I did a bunch of little thumbnail sketches with a very loose sense of space and picked the one I liked best.

3. Scanned the thumbnail and drew a little more clearly over it. Worked out the rough space before using formal perspective.

4. Reinforced the space with formal perspective. I dropped in pre-made vanishing points over my drawing. If I were drawing in real media here’s where I’d get out the ruler to sketch in some accurate space.

5. Drew the damn thing. Because I do my research, draw from life, and am comfortable drawing in perspective, I can wing it. I just sort of ‘build’ the ruins freehand in the space I’ve established, keeping it more or less accurate, experimenting and playing with details along the way. I erase a lot, too, both in PS and when drawing in pencil. Keeps it fun for me.

And that’s what I know about composition and perspective. If you want more formal instruction on perspective and it’s uses, you can use John Buscema’s How to Draw Comics the Marvel Way. Or If you want to get really intense about it, Andrew Loomis can help you

eyecaging:

4 year development. 

1st row- I was at home for a awhile studying on my own. Frequently book stores and just sitting down and drawing everyday. Getting used to drawing 9+ hours a day and making it my new lifestyle.

2nd row- My school development. My 1st 6 month term at Watts Atelier went from barely being able to draw a head in 20 mins to doing a completed lay-in. 2nd 6 month term I pushed myself to finished renderings and started traditionally painting in gouache. The reason I’m learning how to drivety drive is so I can take classes on the weekend again.

3rd row- Painting studies really helped me push my rendering abilities. I switch between master studies to photo studies a lot. I want to start doing life studies though and making set ups to paint from.

Character Design related: I’ve never taken a character design class, but I been taking classes at other things I was weaker at for example sci-fi and environments. I been studying it for a year now taking classes with Kemp Remillard and Paul Christopher multiple times. I am now getting work solely for my sci-fi work and it has been really exciting. As well as listening to John Parks lectures over and over and doing exercises from it. I’m going to be moving onto environments pretty heavy handedly.

It’s been great!! I hope to continue growing and keep learning from my friends and fellow artists. I want to keep doing traditional on par with my digital and trek more deeply into gouache and doing plein air. I have around 6 projects that I am still working on and want to at least commit two to a finish before February. I want to try my hand at tutorials but topics like how to make a parallaxing background and how to set it up in Unity. Doing turn arounds and keeping all the measurements exact so your modelers don’t murder you for your misproportions. Trying to cover topics I don’t normally see.

Artistic progress in action!

elysiumsanscosplay:

Part II of my silk dyeing and painting process… click below to read my explanation~ (*⌒∇⌒*)ノ

For this project, I went for free-style silk painting. There’s another method where you use a resist called gutta to draw your design lines in. After it dries you can then paint on the inner part of the lines, and the silk dye will not bleed outside them. I will demonstrate this very soon, as there is one more piece for my Terra costume that requires this!

Read More

ajacquelineofalltrades:

There have been a few people interested in knowing what the plastic material is that I’m currently using for my armor. It’s called “Plas-Tex”, and I found it at Menards in their selection of plastic paneling. As the sticker states, it’s used for bathrooms and is water proof.

For this giant sheet, I paid under $20 (I think it was closer to $15, though), and I still have a lot of the sheet left to use for future projects. The glue I’ve been using with amazing success is of the Loctite variety, and it’s one of the quick hold kinds. This means that make sure before you set it down that it’s in place as it does set and hold REALLY FAST.

I also keep getting asked how flexible it is. To prep for making the gauntlets take their round arm shape, I found I could roll and “soften” it up a bit, or even just use clamps to hold it in place overnight.  However, even if you bend this stuff, it doesn’t keep the bent mark, and will eventually go back to it’s original shape on its own (that’s why you need the glue or at least fasteners to hold it in the shape you want).

I like it. I like what I’ve been able to do with it so far, and how it’s given me armor that feels at least halfway like real armor. It’s also a oneup from craft foam armor, which I always feel like will get smushed if someone bumps up against me or I lean against a table too hard. Paints well, keeps the paint well, and staggeringly cheap for how much I got in just one sheet. Tip: Use a GOOD pair of industrial scissors to cut it, rather than just a regular pair.

Hope that gives people a little more info!

freeglassart asked: You may get asked this a lot, so please excuse my ignorance - but how do you go about constructing character expressions and body language and such? Thanks!

degamo:

makanidotdot:

Besides The Basics (construction of heads and skulls and muscles and skeletons and how they move), I’ll go over some things I’ve been trying to work on myself lately:

1. Treat expressions as a single gesture of the face/head, as opposed to a head and then individual features dumped on a plate and arranged into an expression.

First, just get down the big shapes of your expression, just like you would for a pose.  

So say I wanna do a low angle angry pose.  I know the features are gonna be all mashed down at the bottom because of perspective.

 Scribble it down

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start to put on features

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fix stuff

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put on more stuff

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fix stuff again

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erasing and flipping and stuff a whole bunch until you are happy with it or stop caring

Whole head is a gesture!image

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2. Just like a facial expression, jot down where the important parts of an entire pose goes first.  You can force the rest of the body to fit the pose.

So here I knew I wanted the shoulders tilted a certain direction, and te hand to be in that particular position in front of her face. 

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That’s the simplest explanation I got.  Don’t be afraid to push and pull faces and bodies around! Worry about being “on model” last!

I’m feel really strongly about this right now and I weirdly enough think about this a lot so I’m gonna word vomit a little buuutttt

Makani is seriously like my favourite artist ever and I think when it kind of comes down to it probably had the biggest hand in teaching me how to draw?? I’ve been looking at her stuff ever since I started going on the internet when I was like 2 years old (I feel like this is common) but kind of never really thought about it aside from consuming as a  fan however I guess getting into tf2 and meeting makani on the chan seriously changed how I drew entirely and it’s really bizarre to think about how such a huge factor in the way I draw today was from playing around on tf2chan LOL I feel like I never would’ve drawn characters/ interactions/ facial expressions/ etcetc if it wasn’t for that.

Anyways I guess makani has just stayed consistently impressive and incredible and I still just go look at her art like every day and start deliriously laughing because she’s so fucking good LOL Thanks for coming to my TED talk on makani 

ricelily:

All these pages are 8.5x11, 300 dpi. Feel free to print it out in full size if you like physical copies

Comics and Comic Artists

Jake Wyatt- deviantart tumblr

"Welcome To Summers"

"Soliloquy"

Suggested Reading/Books:

Scott McCloud’s “Making Comics” (entirely done in comic format)

Exercises/Practices/Tutorials:

Lettering

Speech Bubbles Mistakes

Paint Bucket Resource

Storyboarding and Camera angles

What is DPI?

Transferring Traditional to Digital (Photoshop Tutorial)

harteus:

super quick nose painting tutorial + a million examples, because i can’t get enough of these darn noses. i wanna stroke them forever.

siffy:

Just bringing over a tip I posted on Facebook that I thought might helpful to cosplay folks.
Soooo a lot of times the metal buckles you grab off the shelf be it for armor or straps or jackets are going to be a shiny plated nickel. It’s possible to find an antique nickel finish, but it’s rarer, especially if you don’t have a specialty store like Tandy Leather near you. For me, Tandy didn’t have the antique finish in the buckles I liked best, so I picked up the shiny ones and tried to figure out a way to age them for Fili.After some internet digging I found a few different methods for darkening/aging the metal, but I didn’t really have the time or tools for them. Then I randomly found this product and decided, why not. The stuff is called… Nickel Ager. And hallelujah, it does exactly what it says. In the pic above, you can see how shiny my buckles were in the top picture. The middle picture was after letting them sit in the solution of Nickel Ager for TWO MINUTES and then letting them dry overnight. After that I buffed them with steel wool, and the result is the bottom right buckle. Bottom left is before being buffed. The result is beautiful, and half a bottle of the smallest bottle covered 6 buckles and a handful of studs and probably would have gone further if I was being careful (aka not lazy).So yeah, if you have bright shiny nickel plated buckles and need them to have a natural aged look, THIS.

siffy:

Just bringing over a tip I posted on Facebook that I thought might helpful to cosplay folks.

Soooo a lot of times the metal buckles you grab off the shelf be it for armor or straps or jackets are going to be a shiny plated nickel. It’s possible to find an antique nickel finish, but it’s rarer, especially if you don’t have a specialty store like Tandy Leather near you. For me, Tandy didn’t have the antique finish in the buckles I liked best, so I picked up the shiny ones and tried to figure out a way to age them for Fili.

After some internet digging I found a few different methods for darkening/aging the metal, but I didn’t really have the time or tools for them. Then I randomly found this product and decided, why not. The stuff is called… Nickel Ager. And hallelujah, it does exactly what it says. In the pic above, you can see how shiny my buckles were in the top picture. The middle picture was after letting them sit in the solution of Nickel Ager for TWO MINUTES and then letting them dry overnight. After that I buffed them with steel wool, and the result is the bottom right buckle. Bottom left is before being buffed. The result is beautiful, and half a bottle of the smallest bottle covered 6 buckles and a handful of studs and probably would have gone further if I was being careful (aka not lazy).

So yeah, if you have bright shiny nickel plated buckles and need them to have a natural aged look, THIS.